Microgreens vs. Sprouts

Piles of Microgreens

Microgreens: a Safe and Healthy Alternative to Sprouts

 

Microgreens should not be confused with sprouts. Sprouts are made from germinating seeds in water for a short period of time (usually 48 to 72 hours) with little to no sunlight––just long enough to grow roots, a stem, and small, underdeveloped leaves. Because of this soil-less, rudimentary growing method that encourages the proliferation of dangerous pathogens, sprouts pose a serious food safety risk and contain little added nutritional value. Microgreens, on the other hand, are carefully grown with the highest food safety standards in nutrient-rich soil and full sun until the plant reaches an ideal stage of maturity.

The FDA advises everyone to avoid consumption of raw sprouts. No such warning has been issued against the consumption of microgreens –– there are many growers operating throughout the country producing microgreens that are food safe for children, the elderly, pregnant women or people otherwise immuno-compromised. C&L Farms Grows LLC is proud to be among these growers who uphold the highest standards of food safety.

Insist that your produce is local and food safe!


We already have a growing social media presence on FacebookGoogle+Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

RECIPE: Pear, Prosciutto, and Arugula Microgreens Pizza

Pear, Prosciutto, and Arugula Microgreens PizzaPear, Prosciutto, Arugula Microgreens, Pizza

This recipe combines 3 of my favorite ingredients onto pizza dough to make a sweet, savory, and spicy pizza for friends and family to enjoy.

Ingredients
2 red pears, sliced thin
1/2 red onion, sliced thin
6 very thin slices of prosciutto
2 cups of mozzarella cheese
3 pieces of whole wheat Naan bread (or fresh dough from Publix Deli)
¼ cup olive oil or as needed
3 tablespoon. coconut oil
3 tablespoon. honey
1 tablespoon dry rosemary
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
2 cups arugula microgreens

Optional:
Fresh Basil
Butter (to saute pears)

Directions
– Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
– Cook onion on med heat with a little coconut oil till soft and just starting to caramelize.
While onions cook cut pears lengthwise in thin slices, remove any core. and cut those pieces into 2 to 3 inch pieces.
– Set aside cooked onion and add to pan a little more coconut oil and or butter, place pears in pan in single layers and cook on both sides till just starting to soften. You may have to do a few batches.
– Meanwhile whisk olive oil, honey and rosemary in a bowl. Brush both sides of your naan bread with the mixture, place on cookie sheet or pizza stone and cook 4 to 5 min on each side.
– While naan is cooking, finish pears and tear prosciutto into small strips. Layer ingredients on naan bread as followed: spread cheese, top with onions then pears and last the prosciutto. Put your pizzas back in the oven for about 10 min or until cheese is melted and prosciutto is starting to crisp.
– Add some balsamic vinegar to the olive oil mixture. Top pizzas with arugula microgreens and a little fresh basil cut in strips, then drizzle pizza with olive oil mixture.

We already have a growing social media presence on FacebookGoogle+Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

RECIPE: Sunshine Smoothie

Sunshine Smoothie, C&L Farms Grows RecipesSunshine Smoothie

16 oz  sunflower microgreens + 4 oz broccoli microgreens provides the perfect amount of greens to make this smoothie all week long!

Ingredients

About 2 oz sunflower microgreens
About 1/2 oz broccoli microgreens
1/2 banana – chopped, frozen
1/4 cup frozen pineapple chunks
1/2 teaspoon chia or flax seeds
Ice
1/2 cup water or Almond milk or Soy Milk (to help with blending)

 

Directions
– Place items in blender in the order indicated on recipe.
– Add water to help with blending.

 

Recommendations

Please try new combinations of microgreens to suit your palate.  Mixing up the fruit is perfectly okay also so don’t be afraid to experiment.

 

We already have a growing social media presence on FacebookGoogle+Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

RECIPE: Shrimp and Microgreens Wraps

Shrimp and Microgreens Wraps

Shrimp and Microgreens Wraps

Serves 4 as an appetizer

Here, microgreens replace lettuce in these nontraditional Asian spring rolls.

8 rice paper wrappers*
1 large bowl of very warm water
1/4 cup red pickled ginger, julienne*
1 1/2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds or black sesame seeds
1/2 pound cooked medium shrimp, shelled and deveined
1/2 cup cilantro microgreens or coarsely chopped tender young cilantro
1/4 cup mint leaves (optional)
2 1/2 cups mixed mild microgreens: tat-soi, mizuna, beets, and chard
Nuoc Cham (recipe follows)

(more…)

RECIPE: Homegrown Microgreens Salad

 

Homegrown Microgreens Salad

Microgreens Salad recipe

Microgreens are packed with vitamins and minerals.

Ingredients

  • For the Salad:
  • 1 cup of microgreens
  • 1 blood orange, peeled and cubed
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled and cubed
  • 1/2 cup of shredded carrot or daikon radish
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • For the Dressing:
  • 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 clove chopped garlic (optional)
  • A dash of salt and pepper

Directions

  1. If your microgreens have some soil on them, give them a light wash and air dry them in a colander for a few moments. (They are very fragile so need to be handled with care).
  2. Place them in a bowl and add the remaining salad ingredients.
  3. Stir up your vinaigrette in a little jar and pour on top of the salad.

Yield: 1-2 servings

Recipe from http://www.pbs.org/food/kitchen-vignettes/homegrown-microgreens-salad/

We already have a growing social media presence on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

RECIPE: Roasted Root Veggie Fajita with Microgreens

Roasted Root Veggie Fajitas

We already have a growing social media presence on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

Benefits of Microgreens In Your Diet

Basil Microgreens

Microgreens are a healthy snack which can be eaten right out of the bag or added to your favorite soup, salad, or sandwich.  Here are some examples of the benefits of microgreens in your diet.

 

  • Broccoli Microgreens are full of vitamin C and Sulforaphane, which contains anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-microbial properties.
  • Sunflower Shoots  have Vitamin D, chlorophyll,  complete proteins, and Amino Acids.
  • Wheatgrass Juice offers several nutritional and medicinal benefits listed here.  Wheatgrass juice can help increase red blood cell count, lower blood pressure, stimulate the thyroid gland, detoxify the liver, and so much more.
  • Pea Shoots offer fiber, Vitamin C, Iron, and folic acid.

**Here are some other nutritional benefits of Microgreens that Web MD has discovered through research:

  • “The microgreens were four- to 40-fold more concentrated with nutrients than their mature counterparts,” says researcher Qin Wang, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Maryland in College Park. “When we first got the results we had to rush to double and triple check them.” (Warner, 2012).
  • “Vitamin C, vitamin K, and vitamin E levels were highest among red cabbage, garnet amaranth, and green daikon radish microgreens. Cilantro microgreens were richest in terms of lutein and beta-carotene.” (Warner, 2012).

We already have a growing social media presence on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

Microgreens On The Farm

sunflower shoot microgreens

sunflower shoot microgreens

What Are Microgreens?

Microgreens are tiny edible plants, usually vegetable garden plants, that are grown in quantity and harvested while they are still juvenile plants. They are grown in a medium like soil or a hydroponic grow pad and are usually grown and harvested at about 10 days, which is usually 7 or 8 days past the sprout stage. They are used in salads, sandwiches, slaws, soups and garnishes.

 

MicroGreens vs. Sprouts

Microgreens differ from sprouts because sprouts are grown only using water, whereas microgreens are grown with soil. Microgreens absorb minerals from the soil as they grow, increasing their nutritional content.

Because microgreens undergo more photosynthesis than sprouts, they develop more nutrients. Microgreens are further developed than sprouts and have a slightly higher fiber content.

 

Types of Microgreens

Microgreens are most commonly harvested from leafy greens such as kale, arugula, beet greens, onions, radish greens, watercress, chard and bok-choy and herbs such as cilantro, basil, chervil, parsley and chives. The taste of microgreens depends on the original vegetable. Microgreens have a very strong and concentrated taste of the original vegetable. This means that cilantro microgreens will still taste of cilantro but in a stronger, more vegetal and condensed format. The health benefits of microgreens are similar to those of sprouts; however, the specific nutritional profile for each microgreen depends on the type of plant it comes from originally.

Nutrients & Benefits

The nutritional profile of each microgreen depends greatly on the type of microgreen you are eating. Leafy greens are a good source of beta-carotene as well as iron and calcium. Dark green leafy vegetables such as kale and chard are also high in lutein and zeaxanthin.

 

Top 5 Benefits of Eating Microgreens

  1. 1. Microgreens are filled with antioxidants that are useful to the body
  2. 2. Powerful source of Vitamin C
  3. 3. The leaves are more nutritious than their mature versions
  4. 4. Microgreens have a huge amount of Vitamin K in them
  5. 5. Beta-carotene is also found in certain microgreens in higher quantities

 

Popular Microgreens

Sunflower Shoots

Pea Shoots

Radish Shoots

Arugula

Broccoli

Basil

Beets

 

We already have a growing social media presence on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

Seed Order and Equipment

Seed Order and Equipment

The past few weeks have been hectic with the move to the farm and just getting ourselves settled.  There are so many new projects and infrastructure improvements needed.  Below are some of the new infrastructure improvements which are needed on the farm.

New hoop greenhouse

The hoop greenhouse will be the first large infrastructure improvement added since we will need a place to start seeds as well as interplant tomatoes and cucumbers.  I just recently purchased a hoop bender and hoop bender stand just for this project.  The hoop bender/stand were purchased from Build My Own Greenhouse (http://www.buildmyowngreenhouse.com/) if you are looking for an affordable hoop bender for your farm.

Post Processing Facility

I need a post-processing facility built in order to save time and energy after harvesting.  The post-processing facility will be an extension to the side of the workshop and will contain the following:

  • Walk-in cooler
  • Greens washing table
  • Greens drying table
  • Material storage (harvest bins, trays, plug trays, microgreen trays, tools, soil, etc)
  • Greens spinner
  • Packing station

Garden Plots

There are two main areas on the farm which will be setup with permanent beds and irrigation.  This first season will most likely be a “get to know the new farm” season where infrastructure improvements are the main focus.  I don’t expect to be in full production with produce until Spring 2018 but I will be working hard towards getting something growing this season so I can get to know this microclimate.

Seed Order

I recently placed and received my initial seed order from Johnny’s Seeds (http://www.johnnyseeds.com/).  I only purchased a small assortment of seeds which have a low DTM (Days to Maturity) of 60 days or less.  These are my highest profit crops which will be setup on a high rotation system in the garden plots.  I do plan to have tomatoes and cucumbers this season (which are not high rotation crops) but I will also have my Spring Lettuce mix available for the local farmer’s market.

Looking for Comments

This list is not the entire list of projects and tasks needed on the farm but it is currently the top priority for getting started in 2017.  My goal for the farm is to be ready for production early Spring and to begin a more comprehensive list later this year.  If any of my readers have comments or ideas please let me know by commenting on this post.

We already have a growing social media presence on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.

Farm Goals For 2017

C&L Farms Field 1 - homestead, farm, market garden

Farm Goals 2017

Starting a new adventure in 2017 begins with setting goals on the farm.  I am still waiting for that perfect house buyer to put in an offer on the house I have lived in for the last 5 years.  Waiting, waiting, waiting…..

Here is a list of farm goals for 2017.

  1. Soil testing – I do not know what kind of soil amendments are needed until a soil test has been done on the new farm.
  2. Purchase much needed farm equipment – walk-in cooler, Jang JP-1 Seeder, Tilther
  3. Setup permanent beds in field #1 – This field was used in the past but has been out of production for  a few years.  A deep till is needed along with formation of permanent beds.  After that has been done, I will cover the beds with silage tarp to suppress weeds and keep the soil dry for Spring planting.
  4. Move blueberry bushes to a new home – I have 7 large blueberry bushes which must be moved to a new location on the farm.  The area where they are growing now will be the future home of a lean-to greenhouse attached to the post-processing building.
  5. Build lean-to greenhouse – This greenhouse will be used to start seeds for transplanting into the garden as well as used for our up-coming expansion into microgreens.

Looking for Comments

This list is not the entire list of projects and tasks needed on the farm but it is currently the top priority for getting started in 2017.  My goal for the farm is to be ready for production early Spring and to begin a more comprehensive list later this year.  If any of my readers have comments or ideas please let me know by commenting on this post.

We already have a growing social media presence on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We will also be working with great companies like Amazon.com and YouTube in the hopes these ventures can help us afford this website and help us earn a little online income for our many projects.  If you are looking for a book or some of the equipment we use on the farm, please use the links and advertisements found on the site.